Feb 15, 2013

Ameen's Jordan

Ameen is from Jordan. He drives taxi in Boston. I had hired his cab to pick me up from South Station to my hotel enroute Costco in Everett as I needed some basic stuff I forgot to pack. The bridge was packed. The 5 miles trip took closer to 30 minutes one way which gave us ample time to converse. The following is what I hear of Jordan from Ameen.

Jordan is a beautiful place, mostly at peace with her neighbors. Amman is the most populated and everywhere else population is sparse. Jordan doesn't have oil or gold but agriculture thrives.

The Jordan river used to be huge but now too shallow that you could even cross over by foot in some parts. The river dumps into the Dead Sea where all the life it brings dies.

You actually float in the the Black Sea (or Dead Sea). The only thing to watch out for is your eyes as the water is so concentrated that if it gets into your eyes you can't see anything clearly. When you are done "swimming" in the sea you will take a shower in the hot water springs to remove the salt from your skin, if not you will look like a pillar of salt when you dry.

Amman is among seven hills where it snows. But river Jordan runs in the valley which is warm and sunny. It is roughly 25 miles from the hills down to the valley and most people go there for picnic - even on a daily basis. After work they grab some food, get their family and go down the river to spend a few hours of warmth.

Jordanians are closely knit families. Even though Ameen's Mom lives alone every morning his brothers visit her on their way to work and evenings they stop by on their way back home only to be back an hour or so later with their complete clan to spend more time.

Ameen's Mom visits him every now and then. She says American women are more modest than most women of Jordan in the present days. Even Ameen was shocked to see when he visited home few years ago that most expensive smoking houses were filled with women. Men always smoked, but for women it was considered a taboo.

Ameen's family has plenty of boys. They are 8 kids of which 7 brothers and one sister. And each of these brothers got 3 or 4 or more sons but every one has one daughter. Ameen himself is a father of 3 boys and a girl. He speaks proud of his daughter - how she always loves him more, awaits his return in the nights, receives him with a hug, etc.

Ameen's wife is from Jordan too. Cooks wonderful food. Buys meat, cleans it herself, processes it and packages it for the entire season. Everyday she cooks. She loves flowers too so she grows them, roses of red, yellow and pink, hydrangeas etc. She loves her little son a lot as they spend most of their time together. He is only 4.

Ameen had picked up a vase full of red roses for his wife for Valentine's Day from Costco. He seems a nice guy. So much in love with his family, his countries of both past and present.

At the end of my ride he drove cheerfully off thanking me for the wonderful conversation we just had. I assured him the pleasure was all mine.

17 comments:

....Petty Witter said...

Sounds like a wonderful ride, its amazing the things we learn when we least expect it.

NRIGirl said...

That is very true Tracy! Thank you for stopping by.

anilkurup said...

Seemed like a pleasant documentary.

Rachna said...

Super conversation and great story.

KParthasarathi said...

If everyone had one daughter and many sons,they must have a skewed gender ratio with its adverse fall out.
It is good to know you converse with ordinary people on your tours you meet and get to know a lot to share with us all.Most would sit tightlipped when they travel in taxis ,trains and planes

gigihawaii said...

What a great way to pass time in a cab. You learned something new and you remembered enough of it to blog about it. Great post!

eye in the sky said...

I love the way people talk about their own country because there's always a sense of nostalgia. Some interesting thoughts like American women being more modest than Jordanian women. Hmmm.

Mom with a Dot said...

Talking to cab drivers is very interesting. I do that too and with auto drivers as well, when in India. Ameen's story was delightful!

Balachandran V said...

Enjoyed reading it!

adithyasaravana said...

I could visualize the conversation and Ameen is a nice person..

Cjo said...

Nice. Frank & Open. I met one of the nostalgia-infused cabbie, but they are rare these days.

NRIGirl, please accept our invitation to visit us for a Chai, when in town (we are close to Cambridge/Everett).

NRIGirl said...

Thank you all!

@Cjo: Appreciate the invitation for Chai. Will remember the next time I am in town. Thank you!

R. Ramesh said...

what a sweet post..dubai has 200 nationalities..looking at people i wonder how all r so good originally and then y all this discriminations and jealousies and fights..gosh...nature has its own ways.but loving people make this world heaven, right na buddy? haan aiyo namba tamizhla pesaliye...eppadi irrukingo? wishes.

anilkurup said...

Hello,

Please check my Blog Post for an award nomination in appreciation of your Blog.

....Petty Witter said...

Stopping by to wish you a good weekend.

Ruprekha said...

Reading blogs after quite a gap.
A very nice post. It is indeed interesting to talk to people you meet and have a conversation from where you learn a lot.

Anonymous said...

Your way of telling the whole thing in this piece of writing is actually pleasant, every one be able to effortlessly know it, Thanks a lot.


My web site; http://www.mojatu.com/blog/189795/mature-chat-rooms-are-entertaining/

Related Posts with Thumbnails
 
HostGator promo code